Society diversity

Executive Roundtable on Promoting Diversity of Voices and Equity in AI

Rejoin Asia Society Northern California for a Informal Executive Roundtable on Promoting Diversity of Voices and Equity in AI with Diy Yangassistant professor in the School of Interactive Computing at Georgia Tech and Michael Bernstein, associate professor of computer science and STMicroelectronics faculty fellow at Stanford University. This private event is for Innovator, Trailblazer, Advisory Board Member and Board Member and will take place on Thursday, December 1, 2022 from 11:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. Pacific in Silicon Valley. Lunch will be served.

Artificial intelligence (AI) is growing in popularity and producing many industrial applications. While sufficient to enable these applications, there are growing concerns and growing evidence of bias and discrimination encoded in these AI algorithms, especially for important societal applications such as hate speech detection. In this talk, we will discuss the possibility of new AI approaches to promote equity by including diverse voices and detecting different forms of toxicity. The first half of the conference will feature jury learning, a supervised machine learning approach that explicitly resolves label disagreements through the metaphor of a jury. The second part investigates toxicity, anti-Asian hate speech and racial bias by detecting, explaining and visualizing latent hate in language. We conclude by discussing future directions and solutions that can be taken to mitigate bias in AI systems.

This Executive Roundtable Program is a special benefit for our Innovator, Pioneer, Advisory Board and Board Members. Learn more and become a member today: https://asiasociety.org/northern-california/join-our-community

Space is limited.

The Silicon Valley venue address will be confirmed upon RSVP confirmation.


AGENDA

Date: Thursday, December 1, 2022 from 11:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. Pacific
Innovator, trailblazer, advisory board and board member event.

  • 11:00 a.m. Event registration and networking
  • 11:30 a.m. Q&A event and discussion, lunch will be served
  • 12:45 p.m. Networking
  • 1:00 p.m. Event ends

Venue: DLA Piper, 2000 University Ave, Palo Alto, CA 94303

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All guests must present identification and proof of vaccination prior to entry, and are encouraged to bring a mask.


SPEAKER BIOS

Diy Yang is an assistant professor in the School of Interactive Computing at Georgia Tech. She received her PhD from the Language Technologies Institute at Carnegie Mellon University in 2019. Her research interests are computational social sciences and natural language processing. His research goal is to understand the social aspects of language and build socially conscious NLP systems to better support human-human and human-computer interaction. Her work has received several nominations or awards for best papers at ACL, ICWSM, EMNLP, SIGCHI and CSCW. She is a recipient of Forbes 30 under 30 in Science (2020), IEEE “AI 10 to Watch” (2020), Intel Rising Star Faculty Award (2021), Microsoft Research Faculty Fellowship (2021), and NSF CAREER Award (2022) .

Michael Bernstein is an associate professor of computer science and a fellow of the STMicroelectronics faculty at Stanford University, where he is a member of the Human-Computer Interaction Group. His research focuses on the design of social computing systems. This research has won best paper awards at leading human-computer interaction conferences including CHI, CSCW, ICWSM and UIST, and has been reported in places including The New York Times, New Scientist, Wired and The Guardian. Michael has received an Alfred P. Sloan Fellowship, a UIST Lasting Impact Award, and the Patrick J. McGovern Tech for Humanity Prize. He holds a bachelor’s degree in symbolic systems from Stanford University, as well as master’s and doctoral degrees. in computer science from MIT.


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